The Importance of Amplifying Black Stories in British History

History in its purest form is about story-telling; accurate, fact based stories passed down through generations so that we may learn from those stories and grow. I see the importance and power of story telling every day in PR; from how we manage reputation to ensure that the legacy of the brands we work with stand the test of time to the media coverage we gain for clients through media relations. It is all tied together and bound; some of my own clients have been history makers; learning from those who came before them and clearing the path for those who are only just starting their journeys. As a Black woman in PR I am particularly passionate about telling the stories of Black communities in the UK, especially given the persistent erasure of Black history in the UK. This year I was invited to take part in the #BlackPlaqueProject organised by Nubian Jak and Havas to document Black historical figures who have influenced Black British communities and British society at large.

Nubian Jak  are a community trust lobbying for and executing blue plaques around the UK to bring awareness to influential and historical members of the black community.  There is a large disparity in the numbers of black historical figures honored with plaques in comparison to their white counterparts; and Nubian Jak are trying to close this gap. I was invited to select a historical figure and it was an easy choice for me: Olive Morris. 

It’s an important podcast and probably one of my favourite podcast interviews to date. One thing that moved me in particular with regards to this discussion is that Olive Morris could not be contained, she was a woman of multitudes and depth, something I can absolutely relate to – I am a woman of many layers who cannot be contained even in a society that would want to see me contained.  I use my platform as an individual to amplify Black stories on a social and professional level and to be part of this history making series made me even more committed to amplifying Black Stories in British History.